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How to Determine a Diamond’s Value

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The renowned 4Cs define the value of a diamond: carat weight, color, cut, and clarity. An appraiser uses these four measurements to calculate the worth of a diamond, while the quality of the band is added to the value of a diamond ring. It is uncommon for diamond owners to understand what makes one diamond superior to another. When it comes time to sell a diamond, it's critical to be aware of these distinctions in order to receive a fair price.

Robert M. Shipley, a former retail jeweler, took on the mission of professionalizing the American jewelry business in the early twentieth century. In 1931, he founded the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) to give formal gemological instruction to aspiring jewelers. A method for determining the worth and quality of a diamond was badly required. Shipley coined the phrase "4Cs" to refer to the color, clarity, cut, and carat weight of diamonds. This brought together the world's diamond industry in terms of grading, commerce, and education. The 4Cs' combined factors define each diamond's rarity, and hence its value and price.

Carat

The weight of a diamond is a significant determinant in its value. The weight measurement of a diamond is measured in carats, a word originating from carob tree seeds that were used to balance scales in ancient times. 200 milligrams (0.007055 ounces) = one carat. Metric carats are further subdivided into 100 points in the standardized system. Half a carat, or 0.5 carats, is a 50-point diamond. The heavier the things, like everything else in the world, the more expensive they are. While this is true for diamonds as well, there are a number of additional elements that impact a diamond's overall quality and worth. The carob seed is the source of the carat, the standard unit of weight for diamonds and other jewels. Early gem dealers utilized these tiny seeds as counterweights in their balancing scales because of their very consistent weight. In 1913, the United States and other nations adopted the current metric carat, which is equivalent to 0.2 grams. In today's globe, a carat weighs the same in every country.

Color

Blue, pink, yellow, and black diamonds are among the numerous hues offered. White (colorless) diamonds, on the other hand, are the most widely traded diamonds. Colorless diamonds become more precious as they get more colorless. A colorless diamond enables more light to flow through, resulting in wider light dispersion and, in layman's words, a sparklier diamond. Diamonds come in a variety of colors, including colorless, pale yellow, brown, and even gray. Color alone may make a considerable variation in the value of diamonds with equal cut, clarity, and carat. The GIA color-grading system is the industry standard for diamonds. The scale starts with the letter D, which stands for colorless, and progresses to the letter Z, which stands for pale yellow or brown. The color look of each letter grade is precisely specified. Under regulated lighting and exact viewing circumstances, diamonds are color-graded by comparing them to stones of known hue. Color variations may have a big impact on the value of a diamond. Color alone may make a difference in the value of two diamonds with the same clarity, weight, and cut. Even a smidgeon of hue may make a significant impact in value.

Clarity

Clarity is a term used to describe a diamond's purity. A diamond's clarity is determined by the number and position of internal defects, known as inclusions, and outward markings, known as blemishes. The fewer faults in a diamond, the rarer it is and the more valuable it is. Inclusions are internal characteristics of diamonds, whereas blemishes are surface imperfections. They're referred to as clarity qualities when they're combined. The lack of inclusions and imperfections is referred to as clarity. Scratches and nicks on a diamond's surface are examples of imperfections. Inclusions are usually found on the interior of the stone, and some may breach the surface. When a diamond is formed, small diamond or other mineral crystals can become stuck inside. They may persist after the stone has been cut and polished, depending on where they are placed, and they can influence the look of a diamond. Although clarity qualities can have a detrimental impact on a diamond's value, they can also have a favorable impact. For one reason, they aid gemologists in distinguishing genuine diamonds from imitations. In addition, because no two diamonds are alike in terms of inclusions, they can aid in the identification of particular stones. They can also give vital information to scientists regarding the genesis of diamonds.

Cut

While the other Cs of a diamond are determined by nature, the worth and brilliance of a diamond are determined by the artisan who cuts it. The cut of a diamond is what determines how much light is reflected through it. The cut is what allows the correct amount of light to interact with every angle and facet of a diamond and be returned to the eye, releasing the diamond's fire and brilliance. The diamond will seem dark and ugly if light enters via the crown and exits through the pavilion. Diamonds with varying proportions and a high polish make greater use of light, making them brighter, more colorful, and more dazzling. It's crucial to remember that there are a lot of different percentage combinations that might affect how the diamond interacts with light and how appealing it is to the person looking at it. Individual tastes have a part as well. Individuals inside the grade range have the choice to pick the appearance they like. The terms cut and form are frequently used interchangeably. They conceive of cut as the diamond's form or outline, rather than the facets that must be arranged to give a pleasing look.

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