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Explanation of the Basics of 2 Carat Diamonds (Size, Price and 4cs)

If you're looking for an engagement ring with a large diamond, you're probably looking for something from the 2 carat range. Of course, there are larger diamonds, but 2 carat diamonds are often considered the "sweet spot" for many people because they are large and flashy enough but not too expensive. What factors should you consider when selecting a 2 carat stone for your engagement ring? What should you look for in a large diamond, and how are they different from what you'd look for in a smaller diamond? There's a lot to say about 2 carat diamonds, but we'll stick to the basics in this article.

Do you want a 2 carat diamond for your engagement ring and how big is a 2 carat diamond?

Most people have never seen a 2 carat diamond in person, despite the fact that 2 carats weigh only 400 milligrams (0.4 grams). That's about the size of half a raisin, but it's quite large for a diamond. If you're curious, an engagement ring diamond's average size is 0.9 carats, so 2 carat stones are more than twice as large. A diamond size preview option is available on some online retail sites, where you can see the diamond on the hand of a model to get an estimate of the carat size. The size of your finger and the setting will have a significance on how the diamond appears.

Depending on the shape of the diamond, the average table surface area of a 2 carat diamond will be around 8x8mm (but could also be 613, 99, 707, and so on). So, would you want such a large stone in your engagement ring?

If they could afford it, most people would.

2 carat diamonds are stunning to look at, especially if they are well-cut, have excellent clarity, and have been expertly crafted into their ring and setting. However, it could be argued that they are overly large – after all, a 1 to 1.2 carat diamond looks large, is still larger than the average, and is significantly less expensive than a 2 carat diamond. At the end of the day, whether you want a 2 carat diamond or something smaller is a matter of personal preference.

What is the value of a 2 carat diamond?

Diamonds with a carat weight of 2 carats are expensive. Diamonds of this carat weight can cost anywhere from $5,000 to $60,000 or more, depending on their quality. A 2 carat round brilliant diamond with a good cut will cost around $20,000 on average. So, why are 2 carat diamonds so expensive when 1 carat stones can be found for under $5,000? The reason for this is that the price of a diamond per carat increases exponentially as the carat weight increases. A two 0.50 carat diamond will not cost the same as a 1 carat diamond, and a 2 carat diamond will not cost the same as two 1 carat diamonds. Compare the prices of.50, 1, and 2 carat diamonds to demonstrate these points. Take note of how the prices rise as the carat weight rises.

The reason for this is simple: larger diamonds are rarer than smaller diamonds, so they are expected to be more expensive. It's normal for a high-quality diamond in a larger carat range to be more expensive, as it's extremely difficult to find and produce a clear, well-cut, and beautiful stone that's also extremely heavy.

The 4Cs of 2 carat diamonds

Let's take a look at the factors that influence the quality – and thus the price – of a 2 carat diamond. The 4Cs – carat, cut, clarity, and color – are the same as they are for any other diamond. With the carat set at 2 carats in this case, the other three factors are crucial to the appearance of each stone. Before we get started, keep in mind that any diamond you buy – especially one of this size and price – should come with a certificate from a reputable lab like the GIA or AGS that details and guarantees its properties.

Clarity

Clarity is important in larger diamonds for two reasons: 1) inclusions and other clarity flaws are much easier to spot in larger diamonds, and 2) diamonds with excellent clarity in this carat range are extremely rare. The standard diamond clarity grades have been covered in previous articles, but here's a quick rundown of the GIA scale:

While a 1 carat diamond with an I1 clarity grade can look good (albeit rarely), a 2 carat diamond should usually have a VS1 clarity grade to look good. VS2 and SI1 grades can also be used, but only very rarely because they are likely to have visible inclusions and blemishes. At the same time, going higher than VS1 will significantly increase the price, so we generally advise against it.

Color

In the diamond industry, color grades are ranked from D to Z, with D denoting colorlessness and Z denoting strong yellow or brown hues. While D, E, and F grades are the best, followed by G, H, and I, even lower grades can look good depending on the color and style of the setting. After all, color is subjective, so if you're happy with a K, L, or even M grade, that's great; you'll also save a lot of money because lower grades are much less expensive than higher grades.

Yellow or rose gold settings are best for diamonds with warm tints because they minimize and complement these hues. Unless you don't mind a stone that is yellower than its setting, it's best to choose a higher color grade for diamonds set in white gold or platinum settings.

Cut

Your diamond's sparkle and fire are enhanced by its cut quality.

Cut is crucial to a diamond's quality, especially in the 2 carat range. It is so important that it is the most important of the 4Cs. Because the light performance of a diamond with a poor cut will be poor, it will lack the brilliance and sparkle we seek in a diamond.

We strongly recommend you to put the cut quality of your future diamond ahead of clarity, color, and even carat weight – it's the key to getting both the best quality and the best value/price. Because some cuts result in larger surface areas than others, the right cut/shape can even make a smaller diamond (say, 1.7-1.9 carats) appear larger. Which shapes are best for 2 carat diamonds is a matter of personal preference, with each cut having its own set of advantages and disadvantages. Round, Oval, Marquise, Emerald, and Pear shapes, on the other hand, have a larger surface area for the table of the stone than most other cuts.

Getting the most out of your 2 carat diamond purchase

If you're on a tight budget, the appearance and quality of your stone should take precedence over its carat weight. Don't buy a diamond solely on the basis of its carat weight. Take a look at the diamond in the image below. Would you buy a 2 carat diamond with an excellent cut that costs $7300?

Going under standard prices and choosing a stone in the carat range of 1.7 to 1.9 carats can provide the best value and quality in terms of both quality and price. You'll still get a big diamond, but you'll save a lot of money if you stay under the standard carat range.

If you want a diamond that is exactly 2 carats, do a thorough search of both online and offline vendors to find not only a high-quality stone but also one with a good value/price ratio. Because they have lower operating costs, online stores generally offer lower prices per carat; however, there is the major disadvantage of not being able to inspect the stone in person before purchasing it. Online vendors, on the other hand, have a much larger selection and range of stones, making it easier to find exactly what you're looking for.

Choosing a 2 Carat Lab-Created Diamond

Lab-created diamonds have grown in popularity to the point where they are now available from most retailers, including De Beers, the company that founded the diamond engagement ring industry. The stigma that once surrounded these diamonds has dissipated, and an increasing number of couples are choosing them because of the numerous benefits they provide. These advantages include being more affordable, environmentally friendly, and ethical. The only difference between these diamonds and natural diamonds is that lab-grown diamonds were created in laboratories using science and technology, whereas natural diamonds formed over millions of years in the earth's crust.

You don't have to sacrifice quality to get a 2 carat diamond at your price with lab-created diamonds. You can have your cake and eat it, which is why lab-created diamonds are a good option for couples looking for a high-quality diamond at a reasonable price.

Is a ring with a 2 carat diamond worth it as an engagement ring?

2 carat diamonds are the way to go if you want something really big and eye-catching for your engagement ring. Prepare for a significant financial hit, which can be easily mitigated by lowering the carat weight slightly and experimenting with different combinations of the 4Cs. Engagement rings are typically purchased to be worn for a lifetime and are frequently passed down as heirlooms. Because diamonds aren't the best investment, it's best to avoid purchasing a 2-carat stone without seeking professional advice. You can't go wrong with a 2-carat stone for a truly impressive diamond engagement ring of heirloom quality.

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